Empty Kettles, Full Lives

Every day, The Salvation Army in locations all around the world, and in your local community, send out bGive Til It Helpsell ringers, red kettles, and shiny bells out into the world in the hopes that the general public would be generous. Each day these empty buckets go out empty. The plan is for them to come back full.

The empty kettles mean full lives.

The Red Kettle campaign originated in San Francisco, CA many years ago as a way for The Salvation Army to feed people a holiday meal. Today, it still provides meals. It also helps provide toys, clothing, utility assistance, prescription assistance, emergency sheltering, weeks at camp, disaster assistance, and many other life-changing services. The Red Kettle campaign also allows the Army to reach the people with the Good News of Jesus Christ as we celebrate His birth.

Every evening I see these full kettles come back. The money gets taken out of them. The empty kettles mean full lives. I try not to see the kettles. I try to see the kid who will go to camp this summer. I try to see the family that can stay in their homes because the electricity is still on. I try to see the man who is down on his luck that does not have to sleep on the street tonight. Empty kettles mean full lives.

Throughout this kettle season, as I have traveled around, people have greeted me and shared that they put something into a kettle. One of the familiar phrases that is often repeated is that “I wish it could be more.” Believe me when I tell you that every little bit helps! Every little bit is counted! Every little bit changes lives! Empty kettles mean full lives.

To all of you who have donated to a kettle this year, thank you! To all of you that meant to donate to a kettle, thank you! To all of you who wanted to donate to a kettle, thank you! Because of you, the kettles get full and every evening they become empty again. Empty kettles mean full lives.

Merry Christmas! Soli Deo Gloria!

Let Them Ring the Bells

Let Them Ring the Bells
by June Noble
December 13, 2014

When it is the holiday season
And the spirit is glowing brightly
It is also a time of great dire
For the poor and hungry

Their only salvation
And the guiding light
Are the red kettles and shields
And the chiming of the bells

It takes a special army
Of people young or old
Stationed at stores everywhere
Ringing the bell to signal everyone

As the change falls in the kettles
It is like a river
Of love and kindness
To the people that needs it the most

Let them ring the bells
It brings hope to the hungry
Let them ring the bells
It brings light to the poor

It takes kindness
To donate into the red kettles
It takes courage
To stand in the cold of winter

It takes commitment
To stand up proudly
It takes spirit
To make a difference in the world

Let them ring the bells

This was written by a 2014 bell ringer and presented to me.

So, You Are Moving! 10 Things to Remember During a Transition

file0001207444674 This weekend is a transition week for The Salvation Army in the South! Officers (ministers) have received their farewell orders and will be leaving their congregations and communities that they have poured heart and soul into for other “harvest fields.” While officers are aware of this reality during the training period, reality still sets in and feels differently from the classroom. But, the Army needs to keep moving forward!

Having gone through this process before and expecting to go through it again a few more times, here are 10 things that I have learned throughout the experience. While this is coming from the perspective of Army officership, I think you will see that they can be applied across many disciplines.

1. Your family is moving with you!

It is important to remember that when ministers move, their families move with them. They are leaving friends and relationships as well. They are leaving schools they know and places they care about. They may not always respond well. They do not dislike where they are going, but it is not home. They are leaving home to go there. It will take a while until it feels like home. Also, involved in this, if a child or family member has other neurological concerns, the adjustment time can be even longer. Patience is what is required, not judgement! Actually, for that matter, leave judgement out of the equation all together.

Patience is what is required, not judgement!

2. It is OK to be excited about the new assignment or location.

There is a plan for you when you get to the new location. It is not disrespectful to where you are now to be excited about where you are going. One of the advantages to moving and transition is the new life and energy that the new people are bringing to the location. Bring the joy! Bring the new ideas! Bring the energy! You are going there for a reason. Somebody saw something in you that they wanted there!

3. It is OK to miss the location and people you are leaving.

While it is OK to be excited about where you are going, it is also OK to be sad or miss where you are now. You have spend a lot of time with the people at your current place. You have invested in lives and, in return, they have invested in yours. It is natural to miss those relationships and to grieve for the change. I would be more worried about people who do not miss the people they spent so much time with. In fact, if you do not miss them, maybe you were not that close!

This is connected to #4…

4. Remember that the people where you are going are connected to your predecessor!

When you get to your new assignment or place, remember that the people at the new place are going to be missing the people that you are replacing. You need to respect the fact that they may need time to grieve and get through the change. It will feel like a loss to them. It may even feel like a betrayal. They may not be able to explain themselves. They may even lash out at you. They may even refer to your predecessor over and over. You will be compared to them. You will be measured against them. Get over your ego! The people before you did a great job! Admit it. Praise them for it. Copy some of it. Give them credit for it.

You need to respect the fact that they may need time to grieve and get through the change.

5. You do not know why things were done before you got to the new place. So, keep your opinions to yourself!

From why the piano is positioned in a certain place to why certain employees have different starting times in the morning to the reason behind the schedule of a certain department, there are usually very good reasons why certain things are done certain ways. Even thought they may need to be changed, your opinion on why it was done in the first place does not help the situation. This is an area that I often struggle with because my personality type is one of being a “fixer.” I have heard a lot of advice in this area. Some people say wait 90-180 days before making any major changes. This analogy breaks down when something needs to be changed because it is adversely affecting the health of your organization. In those cases, you need to get it done! I have also been told the “paint a wall” methodology. This method says that you should find something in the first week and change it, even if it means to “paint a wall.” I have never been a big fan of changing just for the sake of change. You need to find the balance and the right timing.

6. Stay away from social media, unless it is necessary!

Let’s face it, social media has unfortunately become a place where people release a lot of passive aggressive energy cleverly disguised in thought-provoking prose! It is probably a good idea to stay away from such a volatile platform. Even if you mean well, your attitude and demeanor can inappropriately color your responses.

There are some good ideas found in this article called, “Social Media and Pastoral Moves.” I do not completely agree with all of the ideas, but there are some good thought-provoking concepts!

7. Guarantee that the person following you has what they need to succeed!

Ensuring that the person who follows you succeeds is one of the best ways to leave a lasting legacy! Just remember all of the things that you wish you would have know, and make sure that the person who follows you knows it. If it is important, make sure they know about it! Transition is hard enough without having to guess where the cord to the coffee pot is, or what the upcoming vacation schedule is, or who orders the supplies, or …

8. Make sure the friendships you have now only extend into the personal, not the professional.

When you transfer from a place, your relationships with the people that are staying need to be personal only, not professional. If you stay in contact with someone, you should only be discussing your personal lives, not what is happening at the office. This is hard when you have worked with someone for many years and part of your relationship is the work you do together! If the relationship is worth keeping, it is worth working hard for! So, it worth the extra effort to keep your nose out of what is happening after you leave! Nobody wins in this scenario! Trust me! We have been on both ends of this one.

9. Do not overanalyze a transition or move!

For some reason, you are moving or transferring!

Embrace it! Accept it! Trust it!

When you constantly analyze the “why’s” and “wherefore’s” and the “who’s” involved, you will not find any peace. You are there for a reason. I believe that it is OK to ask what that reason is. Whether you get an answer that satisfies your curiosity or not, you are still going there for a reason. And, more importantly, God is going to use you there for His reason!

10. Give yourself time and space to adjust to your new surroundings!

While this does relate to #3, it is important to remember to give yourself time to adjust! You will have a new place to learn, a new place to settle your family into, and a new set of circumstances to work through! You cannot expect yourself to get it all down in a week. How long did it take you to settle into the last place? It is reasonable to assume that it will take the same amount of time (more or less) to settle into the new place.

These are just a couple of ideas! What else would you add to the list?

night_traffic_and_lights

5 Lessons I Learned from the General’s Visit

General André CoxRecently, General André Cox visited the southern part of the United States for an annual gathering of The Salvation Army. General Cox is the 20th General of The Salvation Army. As General, he is the international leader of the Army. He was elected into office on August 3, 2013. You can find some more detail about General Cox by clicking here.

In observing the actions of the General while on stage and some while not on stage, there were five lessons that I learned that weekend.

#1: Be yourself, not your position

Throughout the whole weekend, I saw the General differ to local leadership in all areas. He never presumed a position or looked for an opportunity to assert himself into a situation. He was part of the experience. He did not make the experience about him. As an international leader, there is a certain amount of “pomp and circumstance” that surrounds a visit. Finding out that the General stayed at the Training School with the cadets (student ministers) spoke volumes about his character.

#2: Laugh loud and often

The General appears to be a person who enjoys humor and likes to laugh. Whether it was spending time with kids or laughing with those around him, the General laughed and laughed often. He showed his emotions where it was appropriate. There were serious times, but there were also lighter time. He was himself during both times.

#3: Say What Needs to Be Said

The General did not shy away from what needed to be done or said. If he felt led to say something, he did. He was encouraging and full of praise for the Army in the South. But, he also challenged us to do more, love more, grow more, worship more, pray more, and be led by God more! In a day where leaders do not often say what needs to be said because of concerns of popularity, General Cox increased his popularity by saying what needed to be said! He was honest, brave, and compassionate.

#4: Love and support your spouse

Along with the General, his wife, Commissioner Silvia Cox, also visited the southern states. She was just as much a part of what was happening as he was. Although they hold different ranks based on Army tradition, he admitted many times that she was valued and that, at home, she was in charge! While not expressing outward displays of affection for the camera, the General’s love for his wife was evident in how he walked with her, talked to her, and shared the experience with her. She was not an afterthought! She was a priority!

#5: Take Time for the People Around You

The General must have taken hundreds of pictures with people during the weekend. In fact, it became quite thegeneral selfie in vogue thing to have a “selfie” with the General. From whole families to individuals to groups to children, the General smiled in each and every one of them. Not being much of a “selfie” person myself, it was not one of the goals of my weekend. I did have the opportunity to shake his hand briefly during Saturday afternoon. He looked me in the eye and said, “Hello.” He did not look beyond me to the next person. He did not look for an aide to move me along. He did not look at his watch in concern for his schedule. He looked me in the eye. He took the time for every person he came in contact with that weekend.

I was very impressed with the General’ visit. If you are interested, you can view some of his messages from the weekend by clicking here.

What other things did people notice about his visit or know about him from previous visits?

Soli Deo Gloria!

We Believe: Day 1 – Who Are You Listening To?

If you have not heard this awesome album, you can listen to it here, or at http://transmission.virb.com/webelieve.

Have you ever ridden on public transportation before? Or attended a sports game? Or visited an elementary school? If you have, what do all of these venues have in common?

Did you guess it? Noise, sound, voices…

We Believe (album cover)Like each of those locations, our world is full of competing voices. Brands shouting their messaging at you. The media trying to fit you into one mold or the other. People over you trying to make you into them. It is deafening, confusing, maddening, overwhelming… it is…

There are times when I need to see a clear vision. I need to hear a defined voice. I want to follow reliable direction. I crave guidance from a trusted source.

It’s how we hear Your voice, when the world’s so crazy loud
It’s how we make the choice, to seek You above the crowd

Doctrine #1 of The Salvation Army is the inspiration of the track “The Word.” The doctrine says simply that the Word of God is the place where we should find our start. It should provide the clear vision. God’s Word has a defined voice. The Scriptures give reliable direction.

The Bible can give us the guidance we so desperately need!

Your word is a lamp for my feet, a light on my path. (Psalms 119:105 NIV)

In addition to the Word of God, where are other places we can go for help?

Soli Deo Gloria!

This devotional material is based on the album, We Believe, by Atlanta-based band, transMission. This material is being presented as additional throughout-provoking material. It is not meant to be doctrinal material. Quoting from the band itself: “Instead think of these songs as the frame which supports the art itself. The illustration to the sermon. “We Believe” is the illustration. The Doctrines are the sermon.” If you would like to listen to the tracks, they are found here, http://transmission.virb.com/webelieve.
Thanks for reading!

Thoughts from Oklahoma: The Complete List

It has been an amazing experience in Oklahoma!

Here is a complete list of my posts from that experience!

May 28: Day 1-Seat at the Table
May 29: Day 2-Partners in Service
May 30: Day 3-Two Generations of Service
May 31: Day 4-Praise You in the Storm
June 1: Day 5-New Recruits Joining the Army of Hope
June 2: Day 6-The MARC of a Good Partnership
June 3: Day 7-Serving with Old Friends
June 4: Day 8-Big Storms, Small Towns
June 5: Day 9-Meeting Needs at the Point of Need
June 6: Day 10-Spiritual Care Ground Forces
June 7: Day 11-Army of the One
June 8: Day 12-Saying Goodbye but Not Forgetting

Thanks for walking this part of the journey with me!

Soli Deo Gloria!

Thoughts from Oklahoma: Day 12-Saying Goodbye but Not Forgetting

This last post from Oklahoma is dedicated to the all of the officers, soldiers, employees and volunteers. I would also like to include all of the people I had the honor of working with from all of our partner agencies.

The weird thing about leaving now is that there has been so much good done, but there is more to be done! God has called up other faithful soldiers to carry the burden a little further! And, for that I pray for Holy strength for the local personnel who will carry it even further into the future! So, I am saying goodbye, but not forgetting!

There were long days and confusing ways! There was good teams and greater dreams! There was care and prayer! There was walking and talking! There was no “us and them.” It was always “we and Him!” So, I am saying goodbye, but not forgetting!

This experience has changed me. It has changed my perspective. It has changed how I view people. It has changed how I view myself. It has renewed old friendships and made new ones! It has brought out new partnerships and strengthened others! It has shown me a different kind of world, without borders and rules! So, I am saying goodbye, but not forgetting!

I pray God’s peace and protection over this land. For the love and care of the Father, I place these people in Your capable hands. Knowing that in all things, my God is bigger than the skies!

“For great is your love, higher than the heavens; your faithfulness reaches to the skies” (Psalm 108:4 NIV).

So, I am saying goodbye, but not forgetting!

Soli Deo Gloria!

espressivo (god.notes)

Espressivo – A direction to play expressively.

Colossians 3:23-24 NLT – “Work willingly at whatever you do, as though you were working for the Lord rather than for people. Remember that the Lord will give you an inheritance as your reward, and that the Master you are serving is Christ.”

Relying on God has to start all over everyday, as if nothing as yet been done.–C.S.Lewis

Lesson:

We were given one life and we are to live that life for God.  Our verse today says that we are to “work willingly at whatever you do.”  It does not mean what we want to do.  It does not mean what we think we can do well or get the most credit for.  It does not mean what is easiest.  It means everything you do (whether it’s vacuuming, practicing your instrument, cleaning up your room, etc.), do it as if you were doing it for God.

You probably have heard this story, but let’s listen to it one more time.

When he did arrive in England and meet the Founder, the meeting was far from cordial, Booth viewed Brengle with some scepticism calling him a dangerous man in that he had been his own boss and Booth was not sure Brengle would adhere to the discipline of The Salvation Army. Nonetheless he was accepted for training and made his home at the Salvation Army Training Barracks in London. There one of his first duties was to blacken and shine the boots of his fellow cadets, a job that was considered menial. Rather than complain he reminded himself of the fact that His Savior did not consider it beneath Himself to wash the feet of the disciples. He took on all tasks, from selling the War Cry to preaching on the streets with equal humility and zeal.

Did you catch that last part?  He reminded himself of the fact that His Savior did not consider it beneath Himself to wash the feet of the disciples

We will not all sing the solo, or score the game winning touchdown, or cure a disease, or be the president.  But, we can do everything like we are doing it for God.  We need to live our lives expressively.  We need to live them with as much expression, passion, strength, and courage that we can muster.  Whether it’s working in our house, shining other’s shoes, or being the leader, we need to do it for God.

During the Protestant Reformation, the early church leaders ascribed to five fundamental beliefs about our faith.

  • Sola scriptura (“by Scripture alone”)
  • Sola fide (“by faith alone”)
  • Sola gratia (“by grace alone”)
  • Solus Christus or Solo Christo (“Christ alone” or “through Christ alone”)
  • Soli Deo gloria (“glory to God alone”)

Whatever we do should be do espressivo, soli Deo gloria, for God’s glory alone.

Questions to think about:

  1. What am I doing now that I think is too unimportant?
  2. How can I give that thing over to God’s glory?
  3. How can I praise God during the most boring part of my day?

Prayer:

Dear God, help me to turn over my complete life to you and for your glory.  You should be praised in everything that I do today, tomorrow, and forever.  Amen.

Twas The Night Before Moves v.2.0

‘Twas the night before Moves,when all through the Corps
All the people were nervous for what was in store.
The cell phones were plugged in their chargers with care,
In hopes that tomorrow no calls would they bear.

The Off’cers were cowered all stiff in their beds,
While visions of bubble wrap danced in their heads.
And missus in her jammies, and I, sans a snore,
Couldn’t settle our brains for a few hours more.

When out on the lawn there arose such a clatter,
I sprang from the bed to see what was the matter.
Away to the window I flew like a flash,
Tore open the shutters and threw up the sash.

The moon, which was glistenin’ on my dew-speckled lawn
Gave the lustre of mid-day in those hours ‘fore dawn.
When, what to my wondering ears now did roar,
But a nice new crown vic with a shield on the door.

When the driver stepped out with a look of pure glee,
I knew in that sec it must be the DC.
He pulled out a clipboard as the car groaned and hissed,
and I guessed right away in his hand was THE LIST!

“Is it Huntsville? Or Tampa? Somewhere in Kentucky?
Or Tulsa? Or Memphis? DHQ, if you’re lucky?
From the west Texas town of El Paso to Wheeling!
Which place will it be? Which one are you feeling?

As dry leaves that before the wild hurricane fly,
When they meet with an obstacle, mount to the sky.
The names of appointments flew through my head in a panic
from Havre de Grace to Atlanta (Hispanic).

He was teasing, just teasing, I thought and I hoped
“Maybe I’m not moving”, were the words that I groped!
A twist of his head; with his eye, gave a wink
Soon told me I had nothing to worry ’bout…I think.

He pulled out his Sharpie and I could not miss
That it looked like a checkmark he placed on his list.
And despite all my pleading, my begging, behooving!
He said, “I still cannot tell you tonight if you’re moving!”

He hopped in his car, to his key gave a turn,
And I can still smell the smoke from the rubber he burned.
But I heard him exclaim, to shout out one last warning ,
“Good luck getting sleep! I might call in the morning!”

by Tom Guilliams, with apologies to Clement Clarke Moore

For those who are not familiar with the “moves” system in The Salvation Army, the official “farewell orders” will be handed out tomorrow morning here in the southern 13 states.

On a personal note, my wife and I are not expecting a call, but we are also not expecting not to be called!  We will accept any assignment from our superiors, including a longer stay!

This poem is for entertainment purposes only!